coarse


coarse
coarse, vulgar, gross, obscene, ribald are comparable when applied to persons, their language, or behavior and mean offensive to a person of good taste or moral principles.
Coarse is opposed to fine not only with reference to material things (as fiber, texture, or structure) but also with reference to quality of mind, spirit, manners, or words; it implies roughness, rudeness, crudeness, or insensitivity
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whose laughs are hearty, though his jests are coarsePope

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simple parables of the coarse businessman and the sensitive intellectual— De Vote

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some of the royal family were as coarse as the king was delicate in manners— Henry Adams

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Vulgar (see COMMON 3) suggests something that is offensive to good taste or decency, frequently with the added implication of boor- ishness or ill breeding
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Caliban is coarse enough, but surely he is not vulgarHazlitt

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Burns is often coarse, but never vulgarByron

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it was, in fact, the mouth that gave his face its sensual, sly, and ugly look, for a loose and vulgar smile seemed constantly to hover about its thick coarse edges— Wolfe

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Gross (see FLAGRANT) is opposed to fine in the sense of delicate, subtle, ethereal; it implies either a material, as contrasted to a spiritual, quality or a bestiality unworthy of man
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the grosser forms of pleasure— Wharton

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gross habits of eating

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Caliban ... is all earth, all condensed and gross in feelings and images— Coleridge

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my anger and disgust at his gross earthy egoism had vanished— Hudson

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Obscene stresses more strongly the idea of loathsome indecency or utter obnoxiousness
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the war to him was a hateful thing . . . waged for the extension of the obscene system of Negro slavery— Parrington

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an obscene allusion

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the jest unclean of linkboys vile, and watermen obscenePope

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the rabble of Comus . . . reeling in obscene dances— Macaulay

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it was, of course, easy to pick out a line here and there . . . which was frank to indecency, yet certainly not obsceneCanby

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Ribald suggests vulgarity and often such impropriety or indecency as provokes the laughter of people who are not too fastidious
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a ribald folksong about fleas in straw— Lowes

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their backs . . . shaking with the loose laughter which punctuates a ribald description— Mary Austin

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we stare aghast, as in the presence of some great dignitary from behind whom, by a ribald hand, a chair is withdrawn when he is in the act of sitting down— Beerbohm

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Analogous words: rough, crude, *rude, raw, green, callow, uncouth: *rank, rampant: boorish, loutish, clownish (see under BOOR)
Antonyms: fine: refined
Contrasted words: delicate, dainty, exquisite, *choice: cultivated, cultured (see corresponding nouns at CULTURE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • coarse´ly — coarse «krs, kohrs», adjective, coars|er, coars|est. 1. made up of fairly large parts; not fine: »coarse salt, coarse sand. 2. heavy or rough in looks or texture: »Burlap is a coarse cloth. The old fisherman had coarse, weathered features. 3.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Coarse — (k[=o]rs), a. [Compar. {Coarser} (k[=o]rs [ e]r); superl. {Coarsest}.] [As this word was anciently written course, or cours, it may be an abbreviation of of course, in the common manner of proceeding, common, and hence, homely, made for common… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • coarse — [kôrs] adj. coarser, coarsest [specialized var. of COURSE in sense of “ordinary or usual order” as in of course] 1. of inferior or poor quality; common [coarse fare] 2. consisting of rather large elements or particles [coarse sand] 3. not fine or …   English World dictionary

  • coarse — [ko:s US ko:rs] adj [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: Probably from course (ordinary) way (of things) ] 1.) having a rough surface that feels slightly hard = ↑rough ≠ ↑smooth ▪ a jacket of coarse wool 2.) consisting of threads or parts that are thick or… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • coarse — [ kɔrs ] adjective * 1. ) feeling rough and hard: a jacket made from coarse gray cloth the coarse outer leaves of the cabbage 2. ) consisting of large or thick pieces: coarse sand 3. ) rude and offensive: They objected to his coarse language …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • coarse — kō(ə)rs, kȯ(ə)rs adj 1) visible to the naked eye or by means of a compound microscope <coarse particles> 2) of a tremor of wide excursion <a coarse tremor of the extremities> 3) harsh, raucous, or rough in tone used of some sounds… …   Medical dictionary

  • coarse — coarse; coarse·ness; …   English syllables

  • coarse — [adj1] not fine, rude base, bawdy, blue*, boorish, brutish, cheap, common, crass, crude, dirty, earthy, filthy, foul, foul mouthed, gross, gruff, immodest, impolite, improper, impure, incult, indelicate, inelegant, loutish, low, lowbred, lowdown… …   New thesaurus

  • coarse — index blatant (obtrusive), brutal, disreputable, impertinent (insolent), inelegant, lascivious, lur …   Law dictionary

  • coarse — early 15c., cors ordinary (modern spelling is from late 16c.), probably adj. use of noun cours (see COURSE (Cf. course)), originally referring to rough cloth for ordinary wear. Developed a sense of rude c.1500 and obscene by 1711. Perhaps related …   Etymology dictionary


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